Deportation and Unassimilation

225672_10150182626467824_3242997_nAs we sit on the swing by our little pond, we watched the butterflies flitting about the garden. A copper-roofed birdhouse swings in the breeze. From under that little roof bits of dried grass, yarn and the flotsam and jetsam that make up a finch’s nest have been pushed out the side. Our occupant has begun re-arranging the furniture to prepare for the next batch of eggs.

We too have been busy in our house; spring cleaning has been underway, little by little, since we returned from our trip. One by one we’ve tackled each room. Donations have been picked up. And then there is our box. The bigger box that has held any number of elixirs, potions and pills that have been with us on this journey.

Filled to the brim, it’s time to say goodbye to many of these little miracles that provided relief and kept us on track. It is bittersweet to go through this box. We say a small thank you to each as we set it aside for disposal. There is a feeling of ceremony. Each bottle brings back a memory. We thanked thorazine for quieting the barking seal that the hiccups brought and we remember the overnight chemo where we recorded the sounds that reminded us of San Francisco’s piers and then could not stop laughing when we played them back. Which brought on more barks. Which brought on more laughter. What a catch 22 that was! We thank the tincture of opium which our gastro guy called “the plug” for its effectiveness in stopping the months of non-stop diarrhea. This cure discovered too late to allow Rich to attend Nick’s college graduation, but what a wonderful memory of us sharing the moment of him walking across the stage at Cooper Union via today’s technologies. We thank the lasix for deflating the pontoons; gone before we could test water walking possibilities. We thank the ambien for restful nights but mourned the end of the midnight food fests.

And so we continued through the box. One by one taking a moment to remember with gratitude these companions along our journey. And celebrating that they are no longer needed. Mepron,Voriconizole, Simethicone, Budesonide, Emla, Valium, Morphine, Dilaudid, Omeprazole, Sucralafate, Lomotil, Colace, Senekot, Ativan, Zofran, Emend, Pantapropazole, Ferrus Sulfate, Vitamin C, Albuteral, Spironolactone.

The box was like Mary Poppins’ bag which held all manner of items and had an endless bottom. The list continued. On and on we gave thanks and said our goodbyes.

And in time we came to prednisone. Bottle after bottle of varying doses. It has been our bane but it has been our companion too. As part of the chemo cocktails, it not only worked against the cancer cells, but it also helped to keep at bay the worst of the reactions to the other beneficial poisons. It relieved inflammations from the continued bouts of the different pneumonias. It was a necessary evil that we didn’t welcome but we are grateful for what it was able to do.

Of all the medications, this end was the most celebrated. But at the same time, perhaps the most necessary medication of all. And so we thank too those many corticosteroid bottles for their help along the way. And celebrate that they are no longer needed. We visit our stem cell guru. Rich receives his booster vaccinations. It will be a year before we’re ready for the next set. His bloodwork shows that we can now say goodbye to the folic acid. The first indication of a problem as we started this journey was anemia. That we can eliminate yet one more supplement, one of the first, that helps the body with anemia and to grow new blood cells is another indication that we are on the right path.

We are nearing full circle.

Our box is slowly emptying out.

Tomorrow we say goodbye to another stalwart companion. Our One of Nine will be disengaged from the Borg collective. Rich’s port will be removed. Cyborg no more. In preparation, more blood was collected, this time to check the clotting factor. The tube, that runs from the port and protects Rich’s blood vessels from the toxic burn of the beneficial poisons that make up the chemo cocktail, that catheter lines his jugular vein. We prefer no bleed outs. Tomorrow we will be thankful.

The port has been a less painful option for infusions and blood draws. We are grateful but it is time. We’ll say our goodbye with appreciation. Another ceremony. For the first time in two years, Rich will no longer wear the bracelet that identifies him as having a power mediport. He will have been deported. Another milestone.

But first there is work to do. We need to prepare. Let the manscaping begin!

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